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notes
Sample files

Use elllo audio notes to increase your vocabulary fast.

  • Listen to professionally recorded MP3 vocabulary files of useful words and phrases.
  • Learn over 1000 words and phrases for less than $10.

Each file contains the following:

  1. Model pronunciation of the word
  2. An sample of authentic usage
  3. A simple, spoken definition
  4. Two more examples of correct usage
  5. An image to assist understanding
  6. The text in the lyrics tag ( this allows it to display on iPods, iPhones, iPads, and iTouch).
1000 Words
Vocabulary Set A
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1000 Words
Vocabulary Set B
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2000 Words
Combo Set A & B
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Below is some of the language you will find in the audio notes that is not common in most text books.

Figurative Language
This is language that is very creative, but often hard to translate or find in a dictionary. These examples usually contain three or four words that together make one meaning.

Phrasal Verbs
These words are verbs with a preposition at the end. Students often struggle with these because there are so many in English. Below are some examples:

Academic Words
These examples are words often found in academia or business. There words are often longer and less frequent that most other words spoken in natural speech.

Common Expressions
These examples are phrases that English speakers use regularly to maintain a conversation or express themselves.

Collocations
These are words that are not used much in spoken English, so students will likely not hear or see them often.

Low Frequency Words
These are words that are not used much in spoken English, so students will likely not hear or see them often.