727 Winter in Sweden


Peter talks about how people get by during the really cold Swedish winters.

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Todd: OK, Peter, can you talk about your country, Sweden, and what is life like in Sweden in winter?

Peter: Swedish life in winter is really harsh, especially, it tends to get pretty cold, especially around December, January, that's when it's really cold. The temperature can actually drop down to twenty minus and so it's something you have to do, is that you always have to go and buy new clothes, new thick clothes in order to survive the winter.

Todd: Wow, that sounds pretty crazy. So, in Sweden in winter, what kind of activities do you like to do? What do people do?

Peter: Well, there are many things you can do, especially in wintertime in Sweden is either you go like sled. So in Sweden, in winter in Sweden, you can actually go sledding and also you can go ice-skating, and of course you can also go skiing up in the mountains, which is really popular among people right now, and also for the young people, you can actually go with a snowboard, but usually around Stockholm where I've been raised we tend to do very little things because the coldness actually, it's like an obstacle, because you can't do much really, mostly you sit home and study or you sit by your computer or you just hang around with friends celebrating Christmas.

Todd: OK, what about the food? Like what foods do people eat in Sweden in winter?

Peter: In Sweden in wintertime, we usually eat a lot of meatballs, which is the typical Swedish cuisine. Meatballs, you got potatoes, and of course we got all kinds of variations of sausages. We got ham and it's a little but hard for me know because I can remember so much and it's been a long time since I was in Sweden.

Todd: Sounds like a cool place to live. Anyway, thanks, Peter.


 

Learn Vocabulary from the lesson

it tends to

Swedish life in winter is really harsh, it tends to get pretty cold, especially around December, January.

Something that 'tends to' happen usually happens.

Notice the following:

  1. It tends to rain quite a lot in Spring.
  2. If you run a lot it tends to help you to lose weight.

thick clothes

You always have to go and buy new clothes, new thick clothes in order to survive the winter.

'Thick clothes' are garments that are made with heavy material so that they keep you warm.

Notice the following:

  1. I do not want to wear too many thick clothes, as I can get too hot.
  2. If you go skiing, make sure that you wear lots of thick clothes.

where I've been raised

Usually around Stockholm, where I've been raised, we tend to do very little things.

'Where I've been raised' means the same as 'where I grew up.'

Notice the following:

  1. Where I've been raised, people like the snow.
  2. Where I've been raised, you learn to appreciate sunny days.

hang around

You just hang around with friends celebrating Christmas.

When you 'hang around,' it means that you spend your time in a leisurely way, without doing anything special.

Notice the following:

  1. I often hang around with my sister at the weekend.
  2. We all hang around together in a big group.

all kinds of variations

We've got all kinds of variations of sausages.

'All kinds of variations' means many different types.

Notice the following:

  1. There are all kinds of variations of cars in the car park.
  2. I make all kinds of variations of cupcakes.
Answer the following questions about the interview.

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Vocabulary Challenge

Complete the sentences with the words below.
tends to • thick • raised
hanging • variations
  1. We serve all kinds of of coffee drinks here.
  2. He is used to around with his older sister's friends.
  3. She to get frustrated easily in the morning.
  4. Where I've been , we don't eat with a knife and fork.
  5. Make sure you wear socks so your feet don't get cold.